Tuesday, July 9, 2013

A Fading Sky

Supermoon, Julio Cortez, 2013, AP

©2013 Susan Noyes Anderson

They came: the tired, the poor, the yearning masses,
the flood of people reaching for one moon––
sharing a dream that lived and died in snatches,
mercurial as air in a balloon––
inflating, rising, dipping, begging patches,
blown-up and bursting with sweet freedom's tune.

Their voices soared across the purpled mountains;
their footsteps turned and tilled the fertile plains.
They slaked their thirst in rivers, sipped from fountains,
sucked liberty into their seeping veins;
laid down new roots, too numerous to count them,
scattered upon the wind the seeds of change.

Our Lady greeted all, and still she stands,
holds torch aloft against a fading sky,
whispers to suitors born in distant lands
promises kept or broken on a sigh.
Hope is the light that flickers in her hands,
as fragile, strong, and free as you and I.

for more mags, click below

28 comments:

Brian Miller said...

sue this is a beautiful tribute to our country, its origins and its people....

the flood of people reaching for one moon––
sharing a dream that lived and died in snatches,
mercurial as air in a balloon––

that is a beautiful way of putting it...

Jenny said...

This is beautiful Sue.

Friko said...

It’s good to feel the welcome.

izzy said...

I think we were thinking along the same lines too- (I thought I wrote you a few days ago---) : )

EG CameraGirl said...

The United States is fortunate to have a symbol of welcome as strong as the Statue of Liberty. It's one to feel proud of.

Your poem, as most of yours do, got me thinking. You are so good at that! Americans, from my point of view, seem to have more pride about themselves than other nations. I wish Australians, Canadians, Norwegians, Swedes, Brits (and a few more) would catch a bit of this and feel more proud too.

yaya said...

My Grandparents came through Ellis Island and taking my Mom to visit NY and go to the island and see her parents name on the wall..see where her Mother sat for 3 days waiting for someone to come and get her...seeing the Statue of Liberty and wondering how overwhelming it must have been to come to a place with no money..not speaking the language..having no idea what would happen tomorrow...made me and Mom cry. But seeing the legacy and knowing she and my Grandfather made this their home, became citizens, learned the language and raised a large family..made me proud. Great poem Sue. I hope you've been to see this wonderful monument.

jen said...

Beautiful. And the weight of the title isn't lost on me.

karen said...

I loved this poem. The Statue of Liberty is one of the most awesome things I've ever seen. Truly awe-inspiring, and so very beautiful, both in reality and symbolically.

Leovi said...

A nice tribute to all those who were looking for "The American Dream".

LeAnn said...

Just lovely! We have such a legacy in all those who have sought for freedom in this land.
Blessings!

Dixie Mom said...

Love this!!

The Write Girl said...

Stunning verses. It's inspiring, hopeful, and captures the feeling of a new home in America.

himani rawat nayal said...

It is so very difficult to even try and imagine- what the first site of this lady would have meant for so many reaching the port in those days...liberty indeed was one.

Jerry E Beuterbaugh said...

Oh how I wish it could still be as such.

JDaniel4's Mom said...

This is wonderful! I love this reminder!

Kutamun said...

Gday Sue, you are right , she will only ever be as free as you and i.... Thanks

Amy said...

Lovely! It reminds me of all the toils regular people went through to make this land so great. Not just military or politicians, but the regular people. I don't think about that often. Thanks!

Helen said...

I love this! Perfect for 4th of July time and Mag (1)176!!

Lyn said...

"Hope is the light that flickers in her hands"...All of it..is quite wonderful..should be framed!

The Real Cie said...

My great grandfather was a lieutenant in the Czar's army. He came here in 1919. Interestingly, according to my aunt, he was far less paranoid than my great grandmother, who was also Lithuanian but did not meet my great grandfather until both were in the United States. She was, apparently, rather suspicious, especially of people in authority.

Grandma Yellow Hair said...

Sue what a wonderful post. I so enjoyed coming by here today.
I have missed blogging and visiting with you.
I have been trying for weeks to create a post but for some odd reason blogger will not let me type a post. I thought maybe it was my computer but I am at the library now and still can't do a post.
Have you heard of any one else having this problem.

Hope you are well. It is so hot here I am wishing for fall. lol
Love
Maggie

Karen S. said...

Lovely, my tears are from many thoughts! Mostly joyful!

Truedessa said...

A symbol of hope..sometimes dreams are full-filled and sometimes they fade but, we must always have a light of faith for days ahead.

Susan Lindquist said...

I'm new to this writing of poetry, but when I read a piece like this, I am just so inspired to keep trying ..
this is such a beautiful tribute to the immigrant spirit, making a new life, and embracing a new country ... so good!

Caroline said...

Beautiful, Sue. Your poetry never ever disappoints. You are amazing.

:)

~T~ said...

Lovely poem. Long may she hold the torch.
What would she say about the border fence?

Momza said...

::::APPLAUSE::::

Grandma Honey said...

Most excellent Sue!!

Copyright 2009 All Rights Reserved | Design by Custom Blog Designs/FreeStyleMama Creations